Active learning

"Tell me and I'll listen. Show me and I'll understand. Involve me and I'll learn."
                                                                                         -Teton Lakota Tribe

As the Teton Lakota Tribe realized long ago, most people learn best by doing. Today in academic circles, we refer to such learning as "active learning." Research studies have shown again and again that, compared to passive activities such as listening to lectures, active learning leads to greater student engagement and deeper learning. However, as scholars have pointed out, active learning must engage students in "doing things and thinking about the things that they are doing" as well (Bonwell & Eison, 1991). Thus faculty must carefully design active-learning activities. There are a wide range of active-learning activities that faculty can adapt to their students' needs—activities that can turn traditional lectures into interactive sessions and promote individual and small group learning, inside and outside the classroom, face-to-face and online. These activities range from writing "Minute Papers" and taking online quizzes to conducting lab experiments or touring a 3D virtual museum.
Click each photo below to see examples.

Interactive Lectures

Small Group Learning

Photo by Justin D. Knight  
Source Unknown 
 
 

Self-Assessment and Reflection

Experiential learning

Photo by Kerry-Ann Hamilton  
Photo by Ceasar 

Last modified on 6/6/2014

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Interactive Lectures


Small Group Learning


Self-Assessment and Reflection


Experiential Learning


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